Nutritional Therapy

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Nutritional Therapy

Optimum nutrition contributes to optimal healing and health. Some proponents teach that proper nutrition is a form of preventative medicine. In addition, optimum nutrition is recognised as a key component of a fitness plan, along with exercise, rest & mental conditioning.

Our nutrition is increasingly recognised as a major contributing factor to our health. Close to home, Ireland is still ‘on course to become the most obese nation in Europe’. Proper nutrition does not mean one needs to go hungry in order to prevent or treat obesity. Obesity is linked with a wide range of ailments including diabetes, heart disease etc.

The modern world has seen the development of a variety of ways to grow, process &/or preserve our food, not all of which are considered conducive to good health. Pesticides, chemicals (e.g. ammonia washing of meat) and weed killers have been introduced to the food chain without full consideration to the negative effects on people and wildlife. Increasingly people are recognising the health benefits of organic over processed foods. In fact, World Health Organisations are working to better educate people about their food & the food chain e.g. clear ingredient labelling, menu calorie counts, the recent horse meat scandal etc.

In addition, advances in molecular genetics inform us that we are all unique (i.e. our DNA sequence), so it should come as no surprise that each person differs in their response to nutrition and external stimuli (environmental, chemicals etc.). With this in mind, our patients frequently benefit from one-to-one consultations as they provide personalised holistic diagnosis and treatment.

Jale believes that modern/conventional medicine & traditional approaches including nutrition, herbs & lifestyle (exercise, mental state) should be viewed as complementary, not mutually exclusive. In fact, people who discount alternative medicine as pseudoscience forget that many of today’s most effective medicines were isolated from plants. Many of today’s modern medicines are in fact purified active ingredients taken from complex traditional treatments. However, not all natural herbal treatments can be distilled into one active ingredient e.g. plant compounds used to treat issues ranging from epilepsy to pain, may be comprised of 100’s of compounds with extremely complex interactions.

With the guidance of a skilled practitioner, nutritional plans for many ailments can be prescribed.

 

Note: 

Please note that all the information and all content on this site is for information purposes only. Patients are advised to always seek advice from a qualified medical practitioner before taking any medications, embarking on any exercise programme or changing dietary protocols.